Portland Metro

Quackenbush Farm

Quackenbush Farm started in 2013 as partnership between 4 friends. We were young, motivated, and wanted to grow a business based around community health and vitality. Each of us contributed a thousand dollars as startup, or seed money, and kept our day jobs. We found a rental with property with a brave landlord and within a month of signing the lease, we plowed the field. Over the years the farm has evolved, growing and reaching new markets and customers. In 2017, the farm found a permanent home when Matt and Jennifer purchased 18 beautiful, flat acres of pasture and oak savanna in Eagle Creek, Oregon. Through all the changes over the years we have stayed committed to our ideals, and remain idealistic in our hearts and actions.

 Our focus has primarily been diversified, organic, fresh market veggies. The farm is a thriving business with our main markets being our CSA program, 4 weekly farmer’s markets, wholesale, restaurants, and a small on-site farm stand. Recently we have expanded into pasture-based livestock production, including a small flock of Katahdin lambs and several batches of broiler chickens each year.

 The farm family and crew for 2019 include Jennifer and Matt and their little newborn, past intern and seasonal farm helper/yoga instructor Rhiannon, two RFC interns, a small group of weekly harvest volunteers, and seasonal WWOOF’ers.

We are located in the beautiful Clackamas River Valley, about 30 minutes southeast of Portland, close enough for convenience but far enough away for peace and quiet. The closest population center is the old logging town of Estacada, about a 5 minute drive from the farm, where you have options for food, drink, and groceries, etc. The area is full of adventures and beauty, with the Clackamas River down the road, Mount Hood National Forest, Milo McIver State Park, and Estacada Lake just next door.

Responsibilities & Training Schedule

Working directly with the farm owners in all aspects of day to day operations, you will gain an in-depth understanding of growing for farmer's markets, local restaurants, and our surrounding community. With 2 acres in production of annual vegetables and the remaining 16 acres of pasture dedicated to poultry, lamb, dairy goats, and many future projects, our interns will have the opportunity to gain a well-rounded sustainable agriculture education. 

Our goal is to provide a guided, hands on learning experience in the field, in the planning room, and at the farmers markets, with opportunities for independent farm projects. Overall duties include field work, irrigation, tractor and small equipment work, farmers market sales, seeding, planting, animal husbandry, volunteer coordination, and record keeping (to name a few).  Some examples of past independent projects include building a medicinal herb garden, building and running a pastured meat bird enterprise, building beehives and beekeeping for the season, and writing a cookbook based on farm recipes and crops.

Each intern will commit to 40 hours of training per week, which is typically accomplished over 5 work days, with two days off each week.

Seasonal flow

The flow of a typical farm year for our interns follows the 3 seasons of spring, summer, and fall:

  • Spring (April, May, early June) – The focus of this season is greenhouse work, field preparation, building/refurbishing farm infrastructure, and planting.

  • Summer (Late June, July, August) – This is the time for our biggest markets, big harvests, weeding, pruning and trellising, and more planting.

  • Fall (September, October) – The pace starts to slow a little here, with planting mostly over our focus now is harvesting, weeding, marketing, farm projects, and eventually turning the fields over and planting cover crop.

Qualifications

No previous gardening or farming experience is required, but we do expect a strong work ethic and a willingness to learn.  We value clear and open communication and expect that our interns are actively engaged with questions, comments, and input on the farm operation.

We are looking for two interns to commit to the full season from early April to the end of October. We ask that prospective applicants be willing to meet in person on the farm prior to acceptance into the program.

Accommodations

RFC interns are provided room, board, and a monthly stipend.  Housing consists of two large canvas wall tents (12’x14’) on platforms furnished with wood stoves, beds, some furniture, and electricity.  They are spacious and very comfortable, and are located in a private grove of oaks with an outdoor hot shower, composting outhouse, hot tub, fire pit, and wood sauna.  Other amenities include an outdoor kitchen exclusively for our interns with major appliances, access to our washer and dryer, and wireless internet throughout most of the property.

We provide staples such as grains, beans, oil, spices, eggs from our laying hens, and produce from the fields. We also encourage bartering at our farmer’s markets with our produce for other items like meat, fruit, etc. Interns are responsible for preparing their own meals, but we typically will have one group meal a week. More details about room, board, and stipend will be discussed during the interview process.

 

 Jennifer & Matt

Jennifer & Matt

Growing Seeds Farm

Growing Seeds Farm sits on 33 mostly pastured acres in Corbett, OR, just east of the Sandy River, just a bit south of the Columbia River. Most of the farm faces South, so we get full sun! A few wooded areas dot the farm. There are small seasonal creeks that flow through the property. We have a half acre of blueberries, ~100 fruit trees, a few grapes and a vegetable market garden. There are many places to find a special spot to picnic, or throw up a hammock.

The farm owner Kyrie Eppley lives in the main house. along with her two high school age boys who live on the farm halftime. The farm manager lives in a cabin on the property.  We also employ an animal manager who lives in an apartment in the barn. The local tavern is half a mile away, as is a convenience store and small restaurant and coffee shop. Four miles away is our local Grange Hall, a facility that sponsors events from yoga classes, philosophical discussions, live music, and other community events.

The Sandy river is a great swimming and floating/kayaking spot.  We have kayaks to borrow. Two miles down the road from the farm is Dabney State park, hosting a great disc golf course and nature trails. The Columbia Gorge is an awesome place to hike and explore. We are a short 22 miles from Portland.

Owner Kyrie takes care of finances, overall farm visioning, most infrastructure projects, lambing, and volunteer communications. She started Growing Seeds Farm in 2011. The Farm Manager directs the day-to-day operations and including supervising most intern activities. They plan and maintain the vegetable production, orchards, berries, animal health, farrowing and lambing, animal processing (on-farm and USDA), and product deliveries. Both prioritize healthy people, animals, and spaces. If you can dream it you can do it, or at least try to do it. Mistakes lead to growth. Growth and the unknown challenge us to be bigger and better people. We value direct communication and working together.

Growing Seeds Farm is a very diversified farm. We raise 10 hogs up to market, sell 50 weaner pigs from our breeding sows a year, have a flock of 15 ewes, and raise about 20 lambs a year. Year round we keep 200 laying hens. We also pasture 600 broilers, 50 turkeys, and a group of ducks.  Our orchard includes apples, pears, plums and a few apricot trees. Our half acre of blueberries is for market and u-pick. Our vegetable garden sits on 1 acre.

We sell meat, eggs and veggies to our 3 Portland schools, Growing Seeds Learning Community. The parents and children of the schools come out for field trips about 3 times a year.  We also sell direct to consumers. Our meat CSA and whole and half animals are available to individuals and families off our website or from marketing directly to families from our schools.   

We use a Kubota B3300 tractor for moving feed barrels, mowing fields, bed prep for the vegetables, moving chicken tractors and hog housing.  We sport one ATV with small trailer, mostly for moving tools and feed around.  After bed prepping, all garden work is done by hand, transplanting to harvest.

As we are a very diversified farm the training offered will be wide-ranging and dynamic. Here are some of the main tasks to be learned by an intern:

Seasonal flow

  • Basic animal care: feed and water, fixing shelters and fences, checking animal health and parasite pressure happens every day.

Spring:

  • March - our ewes will be lambing, and we will be monitoring their health, tagging ears and banding tails.

  • Garden prep and seed starting, vegetable rotations, planting and seeding strategies, soil amendments, irrigation systems, flower planting.

  • May - Sows farrowing. Piglets, piglets, piglets! We are expecting 20-30 this spring.

  • Raising broiler chickens - setting up brooders, portable chicken tractor construction.

  • Tractor & ATV use.

Summer:

  • Broiler rotation on pasture, broiler processing for one long day per month - we process 100 birds. Learn proper techniques and tools for safe processing.

  • Vegetable weeding, tomato trellising, fall vegetable planting and seeding, vegetable harvest, vegetable wash and pack.

  • Flower harvest

  • Sheep pasture rotation and maintenance, intensive grazing techniques, tractor mowing.

  • Small motor use and maintenance (weed eaters, chainsaws)

  • Summer orchard pruning

  • Blueberry harvest (checking for ripeness, harvest techniques, market opportunities)

Fall:

  • Orchard harvest

  • Sheep shearing and breeding

  • Sow breeding

  • Harvest preservation

responsibilities & training schedule

We practice a Tuesday - Saturday schedule. Sundays and Mondays are off, with no farm duties expected.  Generally, 8am-5pm or 7am-4pm is the daily schedule, with one hour off for lunch. At times this varies based on the needs of the farm. Time off for vacation is expected (1-2 weeks through the season).

Farming is good, physical work. Interns will be introduced to that reality every day! Most training is “on the job.” If we are banding lamb tails and tagging ears we will be chatting first about the how’s and why’s. Asking questions about the task at hand is wonderful. All training will be relevant to the following task. For example, we will continue to learn about proper pasture management and using the tractor mower at the appropriate time (summer), when grass is growing strong and we need to follow after the sheep to make sure grass does not go to seed. We will show interns the ropes and let them go off and mow! Check-ins are always welcome to make sure new duties are clear and effective.

Most days the farm manager will demonstrate first, and work along with the interns in order to train. We very much encourage and trust each other to be independent and successful. If interns feel comfortable, they are encouraged to bottomline projects. Leading other in tasks is an awesome way to really learn and be confident in farming.

Qualifications

We require the ability for heavy physical exertion, lifting 50 lb bags of feed or fertilizer, bending to plant hundreds of starts at a time, hoeing weeds, pulling heavy carts. Most all work is outdoors, so rain gear is a must. Previous animal or garden experience is a plus, but excitement to learn and physical endurance is a requirement.

We would love to have a pre-placement farm visit.  Our internship position runs from mid-March to the end of October. Potential interns must be able to commit to the entire season. We are looking for hard-working but playful folks who like working as a team or independently.  

accomodations

We provide rustic individual “cabins.” A converted shipping container and small tiny house on wheels are choices for private space/bedroom. Our barn offers a full kitchen, dining room, lounge couches, pool table, reading library, and wifi. Also in the barn you will find the indoor bathroom with shower. The barn is a shared space with our animal manager and potential WWoofers. We have laundry on-site. Visitors to the farm are welcome.

Alcohol and drug rules: keep it respectful. Some barn cleaning will be included in training hours, such as cleaning the shared bathroom, but keeping spaces and dishes clean is expected on intern’s own time.

The stipend, plus room and board package will be discussed during the interview process.

 Former Farm Manager and Kyrie

Former Farm Manager and Kyrie

Swallowtail Farm

Swallowtail Farm is a 26-acre magical little hideaway tucked into the northwest corner of the Portland metro urban growth boundary. We are a five minute drive from Hwy 26, 25 minutes from downtown Portland, 50 minutes from the Coast, and a 10-minute bike ride from downtown Hillsboro and the MAX blue line. Owned by Swallowtail Waldorf School since 2004, the property is home to abundant wildlife with 13 acres in riparian margin bordered by McKay Creek on three sides.  There are 12 acres of wet prairie/pasture and agricultural land, one acre of physical structures, a parking area, an orchard, herbs, flowers, and permanent veggie garden beds. The farm is a hub of communal activity sharing in the abundance of nature, beauty, education, and food.  We welcome participants of all skill levels and all ages in the exploration of biodynamic agricultural practices.  

This year's production off the farm will be a 35 member School Year CSA share ( 33 weeks from September 2018-June 2019), 10 hogs, 3 steer, 5 sheep, and whatever wethers we end up with from the goats, all on pasture. We have three does that we milk for primarily farm use, with a small amount to sell. We preserve and dry all the fruit we can from our trees, shrubs, and cane fruit, to add extra offerings in the CSA, and eat ourselves.  We keep a small flock of ducks for farm eggs, and have hives for honey. We also run a weekly-ish market table for 25 weeks at Swallowtail School's main campus from September through June.

Striving for primarily hand work in the permanent gardens, and minimal mechanized work using a BCS in the outer fields, we also have two mini donkeys that we are slowly working towards light cultivation and pack work in the fields. We prefer a scythe over a weed eater, but have both. We walk behind our tractor rather than sit on it, and would love for the donkeys to be a little more useful at carrying loads. In the meantime, we try to use handcarts over the truck to move heavy stuff around. Aside from food, our animals are an integral part of a large scale restoration project we are working on with Clean Water Services, and play a key role in our nutrient cycling and fertility management systems on the farm.

 Then there's the rest of life, outside farming! We like to dance, play music, be goofy, laugh and cry, find some shade by a creek when it's hot, and a cold beverage in the hammock after a hard day's work feels good.

TRAINING SCHEDULE & SEASONAL FLOW

April comes, and we are in the tail end of our School Year CSA with lots of greens cycling off the farm. Mondays and Tuesdays are generally spent in the field, Wednesday and Thursday are our harvest and Market days, and Friday is generally a day of fencing, infrastructure, and regrouping... But! We live and work with Nature! So, we are always consciously trying to blend the rhythms of the earth with that of a modern-day American life, and  stay  joyfully open to whatever the land is asking of us. April also sees our does in milk, the sheep, hogs, and, steer out on pasture, and our spuds and alliums planted for the following season's production.

May is much the same with the addition of a great children’s presence as the sun comes out and we once again venture out into green trees and warm spring air. The decision to be involved with school groups is something we leave up to the individual, and is only asked if it speaks to them. Every day holds a healthy animal care rhythm followed by whatever tasks are necessary in the gardens.

June brings a small out breath and regrouping consisting of a few plantings, irrigation prep, and overall clean up and organization for the months to come.

July hits with a hot dry bang and daily bed prep,  planting in the prop house and field, and keeping everything watered.

August holds much the same as July. Tending to the animals, cultivation/bed prep, planting, weeding, and irrigation.

September sees the weekly Wednesday/Thursday Harvest and Market rhythm reinstated, school is back in session so the children reappear, and many of our animals are thanked for their service, then tucked into the freezer.

We continue the same rhythm through October. Then batten down the hatches in November with Caterpillar tunnels, low tunnels, floating row cover, and hope. By this time we have enough crops up out of the ground and in storage, or in the ground and protected from the harshest elements, to last us till late February, when our planting calendar begins again.

It is also in the beginning of November that farmer Noah will reluctantly say goodbye to those amazing helpers who have loved and cared  for the land alongside him from the Spring till the fall. Blessings on the earth,  and the hands that tend it.

Skills potentially learned, but not limited to:

 - All aspects of French intensive style market garden management with a focus on fall and winter production.

 - All aspects of integrated animal husbandry using movable electric fencing on a high rotation rate.

 - A beginning foundation in the many living aspects of biodynamic agricultural practices

 - The many joys of living life on a farm, often with 3-4 kids in tow if that suits you, or in the periphery if not.

I am a firm believer in teachable moments. Especially in the experiential-based learning environment of a farm. In a past life I was an Outward Bound instructor for adjudicated youth. We did 45-day canoe trips in the Florida everglades and a few other waterways. The basic model was simple. First, lead by example, then co-create and work together, then hand over leadership and provide suggestions were deemed fit. The succession through these stages is of course delegated by the individual and their ability to display a proficiency in any given task. I have also built up an extensive library over the years that I will always provide full access to, and use as a tool to fortify anything we are working with at the time.

Some weeks will be 30 hours, some 50, with no more than 40 on average. Two days a week with no responsibility on the farm is a goal for all  interns, with the occasional animal feeding in the morning and evening on a 6th day. Time for extended trips away from the farm are open, but preferably will be planned ahead at the beginning of the season.

QUALIFICATIONS

First and foremost, the desire to truly be a farmer is a must, and preferably an all-encompassing one, not solely focused on animal husbandry, produce, or perennials.

Flexible, comfortable in adverse environmental conditions, physically strong (specifically a good back), a good communicator and calm, kid friendly, and community-oriented. The hourly and weekly schedules will be driven both by the farm's needs and the needs of the farm team; adaptability to a variable workload will be crucial for a healthy fit.

The intern should be able to advocate for his or her own interests and needs, but to balance those with the demands of the farm, colleagues, and broader community.

A visit would be preferable, but not absolutely necessary if there is enough correspondence prior. The intern will be required to sign a contract and submit a background check.

ACCOMMODATIONS

Room and board is included in the internship package.  There is a furnished 24 ft yurt out the back of the Farmhouse. Kitchen and bath is shared inside the farmhouse.

Each day, one member of the farm crew will take time out to prepare lunch, clean the kitchen, and tidy the common areas. Wednesday and Thursday dinners are communal meals, and as such, a cooperative prep and clean up feels the best. The farm family eats meat but can accommodate vegan or vegetarian diets. Breakfast and all other meals are up to the intern, although all staples, vegetables, and animal products will be available for meals. Participation in a monthly deep-clean of the common living spaces will also be expected.

Farmer Noah has three children that live on the farm half time. They are a rowdy bunch full of beautiful life, ages 7, 9, and 11. Just as is the case with the animals and plants that we tend on the farm, The Marquis Three are our future, and deserve the same integrated approach in terms of nurturing love and care.

The stipend will be discussed during the interview process.

  Noah Marquis

Noah Marquis

Gales Meadow Farm

Gales Meadow Farm is housed on 15 acres near Forest Grove, and we typically have crops on 7 acres. We have excellent Class II and III soils that we have been preserving and improving since we acquired the property in 1991. We have been certified organic since 2001.

We grow organic vegetables and herbs (more than 300 varieties) including many heirlooms. We sell at two farmers’ markets and to restaurants. A big part of our business is growing vegetable and herb starts for home gardeners and other farmers; we sell our starts at two additional farmers markets. We have ducks and chickens who produce eggs for ourselves and for sale, and several bee hives, from which we harvest honey.

Here is our farm’s mission statement: “Take care of the land, grow good food and sell it to satisfied customers, and provide opportunities for new farmers.”  Some of our commitments at the farm include: 1) maintaining and improving biodiversity, 2) soil and water conservation practices, 3) preservation and promotion of heirloom varieties, 4) identification of the most flavorful and successful vegetable varieties for our region, 5) support and improvement of our local food system, and 6) education of our farm crew, students from preschool to university level, our customers, and the public, 7) participation in University-based research including dry farming, the Northern Organic Vegetable Improvement Coalition (NOVIC) and the Culinary Breeding Network. We are active members of Slow Food.

Our farm is in Gales Creek, a rural community with a store, a fire station, a church, a tavern, and some wonderful neighbors. We are five miles from Forest Grove/Cornelius adjacent towns with a combined population of 20,000+ and access to public transportation. Pacific University is in Forest Grove. There is an active Food Web group in the area. Downtown Portland is a 40-minute drive. The Tillamook State Forest, with hiking trails, swimming holes, mushroom hunting, etc is a 15-minute drive. The coast is within a one-hour drive.

Students will participate in all aspects of the farm’s operations, including propagation, bed preparation, planting, weed control, harvest, participation in farmers markets, value added production, etc. In addition to Anne and Rene', our crew leader Anna Lund and our daughter Laurel Berblinger are mentors. We usually have several full and part-time employees, and sometimes, academic interns as well.


Most of our work force over the years – interns, employees, and volunteers – have been aspiring farmers. We welcome and appreciate all kinds of people. Our interns and employees have included people of varying ages, backgrounds, and sexual orientations. We have had college graduates who majored in English, art, environmental studies, business, and professional baking and cooking; and people completely self-educated beyond high school. Respect for all other people and openness to sharing knowledge and learning from others on the farm, our associates, and our customers is a requirement for our farm crew.

SEASONAL FLOW

  • Early Spring: propagation of starts for our farm and for sale. Selling starts at the markets

  • Late Spring: Bed preparation, direct seeding and transplanting, selling starts and veggies at the markets

  • Summer: garlic harvest, veggie harvest, selling veggies, propagating and planting over-wintering crops

  • Fall: harvest, planting garlic, making products like hot sauce, pickles, and salsas, selling veggies and products, seed saving.

QUALIFICATIONS

We expect a solid eight hours of training each weekday, usually a mix of strenuous and less taxing activities. At the height of the planting season, we work 9-10 hours a day several days a week. We can accommodate some time off, but preferably not during the height of the planting season in May and June.

We expect the ability to be out in all kinds of weather, lift up to 50 lbs, be on your feet at markets for 4-6 hours, do hand weeding and all kinds of harvesting.

We want our interns to be eager to learn and to take on unsupervised responsibility as they become comfortable with tasks.

Interns will participate in Farmers Markets, so it is important to be friendly and helpful.

Knowledge and curiosity about local and global food system issues are a plus.

Loving to cook and/or being excited about using our crops are important assets. We would not reject applicants who do not know how to cook, but we would expect them to learn while they are here.

Ideally, candidates for a Rogue Farm Corps position will visit the farm if at all possible.

ACCOMMODATIONS & COMPENSATION

Our farmhouse has two bedrooms available for interns; there are two bathrooms shared by all. Living room, kitchen, dining room etc are shared. We have twelve years of experience with communal living like this.

Food is provided. Weekday lunch, the biggest meal of the day, is shared, with everyone taking a turn at preparing the meals. Breakfasts, suppers and weekend meals are flexible. Everyone will be expected to clean up after themselves. We accommodate food preferences, but we are not 100% vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, or kosher, nor will we provide highly processed food-like substances. We do not eat a lot of meat.

Saturdays and Sundays are mostly free, except for about 10 minutes of poultry care on Saturday mornings, and occasional participation in Saturday Farmers Markets. Participation in the few Sunday markets is optional.

There is no smoking in the house (we prefer non-smokers) and no use of illegal drugs on the premises.  Moderate use of alcohol is fine, but no drinking before the work is done for the day.

We will offer a monthly stipend. The first month 45 days will be a trial period. The details of the room, board, and stipend package will be discussed during the interview process.
 

  Anna, Anne, Laurel, and Rene

Anna, Anne, Laurel, and Rene

Fiddlehead Farm

Fiddlehead Farm is a women owned and operated family farm tucked into the Sandy River valley in the rural community of Corbett. The farm is nineteen acres, with six acres in cultivation for the sustainable production of Certified Organic vegetables. The remaining acreage is kept in native forest that is dense, wild, and beautiful. Given this balance we are committed to growing food in an ecologically sound manner, with special focus on conservation. We feel very strongly that food production has huge implications on quality of life, environmental health, and community vitality. We are excited to share our practices with the next generation of farmers.

Corbett is a small rural community located just 20 miles east of Portland, at the mouth of the Columbia River Gorge. The area is rich in natural beauty and has many hiking trails, viewpoints, and swimming holes, some of which are accessible directly from the farm. The local grange hall is a popular gathering place with regular classes, potlucks and square dances. To experience all of what Corbett and the surrounding areas have to offer we require that interns have their own transportation.

We take great pride in the food we grow and our vegetables are known for being of the highest quality. Our produce is sold through a CSA, at two busy farmers markets, to a local natural grocery chain, a food coop, several processors, and a small handful of restaurants. Fiddlehead is a production focused farm. Our family derives all of our income from the farm so we work hard to maintain a thriving and sustainable business model.

Responsibilities and Training Schedule

A unique aspect of our mentorship is we are in the fields full time with our new farmers. We provide strong structure to each day with clear goals and expectations, and lead by example for efficient farming habits. We strive to balance physical projects with less strenuous tasks. Not only does this keep our bodies healthy, but also helps keep morale and productivity high. Initial learning for each task will come in the form of clear, detailed instruction, but most of the skill development will come about through observation, repetition, and reflection. We very much enjoy sharing our insights and thought processes, and are committed to fostering an environment of clear, open communication. The training of interns will be a combination of team projects and individual activities that shift regularly. We value the ability of interns to listen and follow directions, as well as observe and emulate.

RFC interns will train directly with us 5 days per week, 7-9 hours per day, on most aspects of the operation, including but not limited to: planting, harvest, weeding, irrigation, wash/pack, trellising, sorting, cleaning, organizing, farm improvements, and potentially marketing and deliveries. We accomplish these tasks through the use of hand tools, tractors, and scale-appropriate equipment– all of which interns will become proficient in the use of throughout the season.

Our crew consists of farmers Katie and Tayne, two Rogue interns, full and part time staff, regular volunteers, and wwoofers during the peak season. We find that having a rotating but solid pool of helpers keeps the work days fun and motivating.

The farm regularly hosts volunteers and wwoofers from diverse backgrounds, and we work hard to create a safe and welcoming environment. Any form of racism, homophobia, transphobia, or bigotry will not be tolerated.

Accommodations

Intern accommodations are either a cozy airstream trailer or a small cabin with a loft. Both have heat and electricity. A fully stocked outdoor kitchen with a refrigerator, gas range, and hot water is shared among the interns and wwoofers, as well as an outdoor shower and composting toilet. Interns have access to an outdoor washing machine and clothesline. Wireless internet is accessible near the barn.

We provide interns with a full and healthy “vegan” diet (although we are by no means a vegan farm) that includes basic staples (bulk beans and grains, oatmeal, oil, spices, etc.) and an abundance of produce from the fields. In addition, we pay for interns to access a food salvage program at the local grange that provides a hefty volume of quality food. There are several farms nearby that are open to trading for dairy, eggs, and meat if there is interest. Interns are responsible for preparing their own meals and there will be a potluck once per week.

We pay a monthly stipend. The details of the room, board, and stipend package will be discussed during the interview process.

QUALIFICATIONS

We are looking for interns who are thoughtful, considerate, hardworking, and dedicated to an entire season (April – October). We value communication, positivity, openness, and curiosity.

Ideally, we’d like to meet with prospective interns on the farm prior to the season starting.

  Tayne and Katie

Tayne and Katie